A Weekend Full of Learning

What a crazy and full weekend! Many thanks to Demitrious for helping me out this weekend with PHP. If you are a beginner, check out Demtrious’s article: Poor Man’s Debugger. This article helped me greatly over the past weekend and I feel like I now have a good handle on what to do when things go unexpectedly.

I spent Sunday working with javascript for another project and found some of the javascript articles on webmonkey to be a big help.

Go PSU and Bears!

[tags]PHP, debugging, Javascript[/tags]

my first wordpress plugin: WP-rssStats.

After talking to Scott I finally have a plugin which I am excited to develop and excited to share with the WordPress community…a plugin that will allow WordPress admins to see exactly how many people are subscribing to your WordPress RSS feed and who these people are. Why would I do this when Feedburner is out there (and I used it currently)? I like Feedburner but I do not like redirecting my RSS feed to a non jappler.com URL because I want to be in control of my own stats.

Why start with this? Scott had mentioned this to me and it sounded very interesting. With this project, I will be able to learn quite a bit about PHP, the WordPress API, MySQL, as well as RSS. This past weekend, between meetings, I read the documentation I blogged about yesterday and I started reading PHP and MySQL Web Development, which Scott recommended. I hope others will find this useful! I plan to really dig into this in the next few days. I am going to set up my test WordPress setup tomorrow so I can begin messing around with project.

For more information on this, check out Scott’s podcast on learning PHP and this project.

[tags]WordPress, rssStats, PHP, MySQL, RSS[/tags]

apache 2.20, php 5, and mysql 5 on mac os x.

After finally getting some to to set up my development environment, I began thinking…why am I not using Apache 2.2 and PHP 5.1.2? What made me think about this? “Legacy Release” The phrase “legacy release” is what httpd.apache.org described Apache 1.3.x as in their news section. I have been using Apache 1.x for several years now, only ever really thinking about migrating to 2.0 because of the need to run a subversion server. I have a solid web server solution in place that has made me very happy for the last few years using Apache 1.3.x, but it is finally time to check out something in the 2.x family, and I am going to make that 2.2. I am going to spend some time tomorrow reading about any known issues (especially with PHP, as I remember that being a show stopper for my interest in 2.0 before) and then install/configure it. Stay tuned for some tutorials on what I did to get everything up and running!
[tags]apache, php, mysql, subversion[/tags]

the art of php include().

Let’s face it, no one wants to make several changes to the same portion of a web page when you have static information/pages. Enter php include(). If you have a common header, footer, block of information that needs to be on multiple pages and the thought of only editting something once instead of on multiple pages, php include is for you! (assuming you have php installed on your server)

Example:
To include a common header:

(you would place this statement in your code wherver you would like your header to be located)

Once you make a change to header.html, all pages that have the include statement will be updated. One file, one update, several pages updated.

On sites that have several static pages, I try to use as many include statements as possible for common elements so that I can spend more time on development and not having to worry about updating hundreds of pages every time something needs to be changed.